Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Mesopotamia: Hammurabi and Hammurabi's Code


 Today's Focus Question  Who was Hammurabi and what was the significance of Hammurabi's Code? 


Warm-Up: Early Mesopotamia Quiz  Show me what you have learned about the geography and early civilizations of Mesopotamia so far by taking the short quiz here. I will read you the questions and answers aloud, and then provide you time to finish. If you finish early, you may silent read or work on one of your digital assignments. 

Who was Hammurabi?  According to your textbook, Hammurabi "became king of the city of Babylon around 1792 B.C. For more than 30 years, he built up his army. Then he launched a series of all-out attacks against his rivals. Within a few years he had united Sumer and northern Mesopotamia into a new Babylonian Empire." 

To learn more about Hammurabi, watch the brief video below. 


Hammurabi's Code  Why was Hammurabi's law code so historically significant? To begin to understand, watch the video below. 


Hammurabi's Code Activity  Now you will have an opportunity to examine Hammurabi's code of laws in detail at the website here. You will explore real situations that Hammurabi actually faced. You will then decide what you think to be a fair way to deal with the problem. Finally, you will discover what Hammurabi declared. You will use the document You Be the Judge: Hammurabi's Code, which can be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom.
 
Homework  Complete the You Be the Judge: Hammurabi's Code assignment, which is due next Friday, October 9

Monday, September 28, 2015

Mesoptoamia: The First Empires

Sargon the Great was the first ruler to unite the city-states of Sumer into one empire.

 Today's Focus Question  What is an empire and how did they first develop? 


The First Empires: Guided Reading  Today we will learn how strong rulers finally conquered Mesopotamia's independent city-states to create the world's first empires. We will read the excerpts from our textbook below.  


Concept Map: Empire  In order to better understand what an empire is we will make a concept map today. You can find your Empire - Concept Map in your Social Studies Google Classroom. We will also watch the video below to learn some examples from history of empires.     


Homework  (1.) Complete your Empire - Concept Map, which will be due Thursday, October 1. (2.) We will be having a short quiz on early Mesopotamia and the Sumerians tomorrow. Please review your assignments, textbook excerpts, and Blog entries so that you are prepared.

Friday, September 25, 2015

The Week in Rap and the Development of Writing

The Sumerians developed the world's first writing known as cuneiform.

Flocabulary: The Week in Rap  Before we discuss the development writing, let's review some of the mportant news events took place this around the world this week with our friends at Flocabulary.

https://www.flocabulary.com/week-in-rap-september-25-2015/
The Development of Writing: Guided Reading  Today we will be reading an excerpt from our textbook on the 'Development of Writing'. The document 'The Development of Writing - Reading' can be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom, but can also be found here.

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Current Events and Study Hall



CNN Student News  As Social Studies students our focus should not only be on studying events from the past, but also on making sense of the news and events taking place all around the world right now. In order to be the responsible citizens and global leaders of tomorrow, we need to be understand the world we live in. Today we will watch a segment of CNN Students News which provides a run-down of some of the key news events shaping the world today. Which news story surprised you? Inspired you? Made you angry? What questions do you have? What do you want to know more about?

Academic Study Hall  In school or college, a study period or "study hall" is a period in which a student may undertake self-directed learning activities, rather than having lessons being taught by a teacher (Source: Wikipedia). Today you have the opportunity to use this period to further your academic success in the best way you see fit. I would strongly suggest using part of this time to completing some of the Social Studies assignment from the past week (which are due tomorrow). Specific suggestions about assignments or activities you may want to work on can be found below:  
  1. EdPuzzle: Mesopotamia: From Nomads to Farmers
  2. Facts About Sumerian Society
  3. The Civilization of Sumer - Cognitive Content Dictionary
  4. Silent Reading and Accelerated Reader Testing
  5. Assignments that are due soon for other classes (especially Language Arts)
  6. Assignments in the Gradebook that are missing or incomplete 
  7. Online Mesopotamia Exploration
Homework  Tomorrow is Friday! We have several assignments from the past week that need to be completed and 'turned in' tomorrow Friday, September 25, including: EdPuzzle: Mesopotamia: From Nomads to Farmers, Facts About Sumerian Society, and The Civilization of Sumer - Cognitive Content Dictionary

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Mesopotamia: The Legend of Gilgamesh


Background on the Story of Gilgamesh  "The story of the god-man Gilgamesh is one of the oldest stories in the world; it was inscribed onto clay tablets over 5,000 years ago in Mesopotamia. There are many versions of the story but the first people who told it were called Sumerians and Gilgamesh was once their king. The people who lived in Mesopotamia discovered many things: irrigation, the wheel, the first codes of law, the 60-minute hour, and most important, writing. Without writing the epic of Gilgamesh would certainly have been lost. The Sumerians, and later other Mesopotamians such as the Akkadians, Babylonians, and Assyrians, wrote the story in cuneiform, the first script in the world." - Ludmila Zeman, Gilgamesh the King 

Read-Aloud: Gilgamesh the King  Today we will be reading together the story Gilgamesh the King, retold and illustrated by Ludmila Zeman. Some consider Gilgamesh to be the world's first literary superhero. As we read, see if you can find any connections or parallels between Gilgamesh and other superheroes you are familiar with.  

The British Museum Website: "Gilgamesh and the Cedar Forest"  Want to explore another tale of Gilgamesh and his adventures? Check out the interactive story of "Gilgamesh and the Cedar Forest" at the British Museum's website here.

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Mesopotamia: The Civilization of Sumer (Day 2)


The Civilization of Sumer: Vocabulary Study  Today we are going to be studying the key vocabulary related to the 'Civilization of Sumer,' using the document The Civilization of Sumer - Cognitive Content Dictionary located in your Social Studies Google Classroom. We will be using an excerpt from our Social Studies textbook to help us understand the lesson's key words and concepts.

Video: "Mesopotamia: Crash Course World History"  Watch below as John Green and the Crash Course team explain the big ideas related to the civilization in Mesopotamia.   


Homework  Complete your Civilization of Sumer - Cognitive Content Dictionary, which is due Friday, September 25.  

Monday, September 21, 2015

Mesopotamia: The Civilization of Sumer



The Civilization of Sumer: Guided Reading  Today we will continue to learn about the early Mesopotamian civilization of Sumer. You will read an excerpt from your Social Studies workbook entitled The Civilization of Sumer - Reading, which you can find in your Social Studies Google Classroom. You will also record key information from the selection, using the document Facts About Sumerian Society, is also located in your Social Studies Google Classroom. Read the selection in small groups or individually and record important questions and answers on the document as you go.  

Homework  Complete the Facts About Sumerian Society assignment, which is due Friday, September 25.

Friday, September 18, 2015

The Week in Rap and an Ancient Discovery

Exploration team members navigate the narrow chutes leading to the Dinaledi Chamber of the Rising Star cave in South Africa where fossil elements belonging to H. naledi, a new species of human relative, were discovered.

Flocabulary: The Week in Rap  Many important news events took place this around the world this week. Let's review some of them with our friends at Flocabulary.

https://www.flocabulary.com/week-in-rap-september-18-2015/
Newsela: Scientists Find Fossils of Early Relative of Humans  One of the news events referred to in "The Week in Rap" video by Flocabulary was the recent discovery of new fossils that appear to be of an early human ancestor. Go to your Social Studies Google Classroom and find the link to the article. Let's read it together and then take the quiz. 

Academic Study Hall  In school or college, a study period or "study hall" is a period in which a student may undertake self-directed learning activities, rather than having lessons being taught by a teacher (Source: Wikipedia). Today, if time permits, you have the opportunity to use this period to further your academic success in the best way you see fit. I would strongly suggest using part of this time to completing some of the Social Studies or Language Arts assignments from the past week which were due today, or the assignments, including the EdPuzzle activity, which are due next week.

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Mesopotamia with EdPuzzle


Getting Started with EdPuzzle  It's time to sign-up for an exciting online interactive video program:  EDpuzzle. Once you get there, click on "I'm a new student." Then click 'Sign up with Google'. Next, you will be asked to "Add a class." Copy and paste your class code. 4th period students your code is e31VvR. 6th period your code is dwKXVz. Once enrolled, please wait for the rest of your classmates. 


EdPuzzle Video: "Mesopotamia: From Nomads to Farmers"  Today you will be watching a video and answering a series of questions about Mesopotamia. The video will stop periodically and you'll be required to answer a question before being allowed to continue. To be successful, you must pay close attention to the content of the video. If you have your own headphones, please use them. Otherwise, you must listen to your video as quietly as possible.  You can watch the video and answer the questions at your own pace. If you don't finish in class today, please finish for homework outside of class. This assignment will count towards your assessment grade. 

Homework  (1.) Complete the Mesopotamia EdPUzzle activity. Deadline: Friday, September, 26. (2.) Complete and 'turn in' assignments, which are due tomorrow, September 18, which include: Civilization Concept Map, The Fertile Crescent - Cognitive Content Dictionary, and The Fertile Crescent: Main Ideas and Details.

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Mesopotamia: The Fertile Crescent (Day 2)

Warm-Up Video  Let's get familiar with today's content by watching the brief video below.  


The Fertile Crescent: Main Idea and Details  Our central task as we read today about Mesopotamia's "Fertile Crescent" is to identify the main ideas and details of key paragraphs and passages from our text. To better understand how to identify main ideas, check our the graphic below.  
The supporting details, on the other hand, serve to support, strengthen, and elaborate upon the main idea.  

In your Social Studies Google Classroom, you will find the document The Fertile Crescent: Main Idea and Supporting Details. With the members of your team, read each passage or paragraph and work to identify the main idea and supporting details. 

Homework  Complete the assignment The Fertile Crescent: Main Idea and Supporting Details, which is due and must be 'turned in' by Friday, September 18.     

Monday, September 14, 2015

Mesopotamia: The Fertile Crescent


Introductory Video: Discover Mesopotamia with Bugs Bunny  Let Bugs Bunny take you on a one minute introductory tour of Mesopotamia, the world's very first civilization, in the video below.  


The Fertile Crescent: Vocabulary Study  Today we are going to be studying the key vocabulary related to the geography of Mesopotamia, also known as the 'The Fertile Crescent,' using the assignment The Fertile Crescent - Cognitive Content Dictionary located in your Social Studies Google Classroom. We will be using an excerpt from our Social Studies textbook, which can also be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom (and which you can also find here), to help us understand the lesson's key words and concepts.

Homework  Complete the assignment Fertile Crescent - Cognitive Content Dictionary, which is due on Friday, September 18

Friday, September 11, 2015

What Is a Civilization?


Concept Map: Civilization  The world's first cities began as farming villages. As early cities grew in size and power, some of them gave rise to civilizations. But what exactly is a civilization? Considering that we are studying 'Ancient Civilizations' this year, understanding the answer to that question is essential. 

To help us make better sense of what a civilization is, we are going to make a Civilization Concept Map today. You can find a document of the same name in your Social Studies Google Classroom.

Using the Concept Map (and the textbook excerpts below), we will first examine the characteristics or features of a civilization. Next, we will come up with a list of non-examples: examples that do not fit the criteria for a civilization. Then, we will decide on examples that do seem to embody our understanding of what a civilization is. Finally, we will decide on a definition for the concept  of civilization. Additionally, we will add images throughout our concept map to help us better understand the concept. (This assignment is due Friday, September 18.)     
    

 


Review Video  Now that we have a better sense of what a civilization is, let's review what makes a civilization a civilization by watching the short informative video below. How is your civilization concept map both similar and different to the information put forth in the video?  

Thursday, September 10, 2015

Quiz Day!


Assessing Human Migration, Surviving the Ice Age, and the Birth of Farming  Today you will be taking a quiz testing your understanding of key concepts we've studied recently, which include human migration, surviving the Ice Age, and the birth of farming. The quiz can be found here. I will read be reading all questions and answer sets aloud before providing you time to work on the quiz independently. Most of the quiz is multiple choice, however there are also two short response questions. For the short response questions, explain your ideas as completely as possible so I'm clear about what exactly you know and understand. When you are done with the quiz, click the 'submit' button. If you finish early and time permits, you may consider doing the activities listed below.

Academic Business Time Due to the fact that there are various assignments that we have been working on that are due tomorrow, I would like to give you some structured time if needed today to work on them. They include
  1. Early Agriculture - Cognitive Content Dictionary
  2. Early Agriculture - Cause and Effect
  3. Costs and Benefits of Farming
Each of these assignments can be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom and are due and must be 'turned in' by tomorrow, Friday, September 11.

Independent Literacy Time  If you have completed and 'turned in' each of the assignments above, you may use this time to do any of the following: take an Accelerated Reader quiz, make a Digital Reading Log entry, read a Newsela article, or read from your A.R. book. 

Homework  Complete and 'turn in' all assignments from the past week by tomorrow, Friday, September 11, which include: Early Agriculture - Cognitive Content Dictionary, Early Agriculture - Cause and Effect, and Costs and Benefits of Farming.  

Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Examining Agricultural Tools and Reviewing for Quiz


Life at the Time: Tilling the Soil  Students: How might you plant a garden without using any tools?  It would be pretty difficult, wouldn't it. Therefore, can you understand why even early on using tools for farming was so important?  

Let's read the introductory paragraph from the passage below. Now take a moment and carefully study the images and accompanying captions in order.



Who probably made the tools show in the pictures? 

How might a toolmaker have been paid for the work? 

Look at how the toolmakers improved designs as time passed. Which sickle do you think would have been most efficient? 

Now imagine that you are farmer in the ancient Middle East and you have used one of the more advanced metal sickles for the first time. Discuss with the members of your group all the various benefits of using a metal sickle. In what what ways will it help you produce more food crops?   

Reviewing for Quiz: Three Videos  We are going to have a quiz tomorrow on the following topics we've studied recently: human migration, surviving the Ice Age, and the development of farming. But before we do, we are going to watch excerpts of three short videos to help you review the content and important ideas. You may use the document From Human Migration to the Development of Farming - Video Notes, which can be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom, to take notes if your choose.





Homework  Study for your quiz on 'human migration, surviving the Ice Age, and the development of farming,' which you will be taking tomorrow, September 10.

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

The Costs and Benefits of Farming


Writing Warm-Up  A cost is something that has a negative effect. A benefit, on the other hand, is something that has a good effect or is a positive. What do you think the costs (the negatives) and benefits (the positives) of farming are going to turn out to be? Share your ideas here.   

The Costs and Benefits of Farming: Reading and Note-Taking Activity  Today in small groups you are going to read an excerpt and study a diagram from your text regarding the costs and benefits of farming. As you read, you will take notes on the Costs and Benefits of Farming using the document of the same name in your Social Studies folders. The text passage and diagram are featured below (but can also be found on pg. 35 of your Social Studies textbook). Towards the end of the period, each member of your group must be prepared to share at least one farming cost and/or one benefit they learned during the course of their study. The Cost and Benefits of Farming assignment will be due Friday, September 11.  


































Video: The Agricultural Revolution  Now let's watch as our friends at Crash Course hilariously explain the importance of the Agricultural Revolution.  


Homework  Complete the assignment Costs and Benefits of Farming, which will be due Friday, September 11, in addition to the assignments Early Agriculture - Cognitive Content Dictionary and Identify Main Ideas (Ice Age Hunter-Gatherers) from last week.

Friday, September 4, 2015

How the Agricultural Revolution Changed the Way People Lived


Cause and Effect Mini-Lesson  Before you can begin to understand the relationship between events related to the Agricultural Revolution you may need to a refresher on the nature of 'Cause and Effect.' Cause is what makes something happens. Effect is what happens as a result. To see 'Cause and Effect' in action, check out the video below. 


Early Agriculture: Guided Reading and Cause and Effect Activity  Today we will read about how the Agricultural Revolution changed the way people lived. The Early Agriculture - Reading Selection can be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom, as well as here. As we read, you will make note of the relationship between key events related to the birth of agriculture and early farming using the Early Agriculture - Cause and Effect document, which can be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom.

Homework  Complete the Early Agriculture - Cause and Effect activity, which is due Friday, September 11

Thursday, September 3, 2015

Early Agriculture (Day 2)


Early Agriculture: Vocabulary Study (Continued)  Let's complete our Early Agriculture - Cognitive Content Dictionary assignment today. Remember, you can find it in your Social Studies Google Classroom, along with the excerpt from our Social Studies textbook, which we will use to help us understand the lesson's key words and concepts.  

Video Excerpt: "The Story of All of Us"  Let's continue to develop our understanding of human migration and early agriculture by watching an excerpt of the program "The Story of All of Us." Take notes on what you observe, learn, and what questions you may have, using the document The Story of All of Us - Video Notes, which can be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom


Homework  (1.) Complete your Early Agriculture - Cognitive Content Dictionary, which is due next Friday, September 11. (2.) Complete and 'turn in' assignments, which are due tomorrow, September 4, which include: Populating the Earth - Cognitive Content Dictionary, Populating the Earth - Questions, and Identifying Main Ideas (Ice Age Hunter-Gatherers)

Wednesday, September 2, 2015

Early Agriculture


Writing Warm-Up  Why do you think many of our early human ancestors abandoned (left behind) the hunter-gatherer lifestyle to become farmers? What advantages (positives) do you think farming might have over hunting and gathering? Share your ideas here.  

Early Agriculture: Vocabulary Study  Today we are going to be studying the key vocabulary related to 'Early Agriculture' using the assignment Early Agriculture - Cognitive Content Dictionary located in your Social Studies Google Classroom. We will be using an excerpt from our Social Studies textbook, also located in your Social Studies Google Classroom, to help us understand the lesson's key words and concepts.  

Homework  Complete the assignment Early Agriculture - Cognitive Content Dictionary by next Friday, September 11.

Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Identifying Main Ideas and Exploring Human Migration



Analysis Skill: Identify Main Ideas  Almost all written nonfiction text, including your history textbook, consists of main ideas. There may be one main idea or multiple ideas. Learning to identify the main idea or ideas of a passage will help you understand what you have read. Today we will read the passage below and work together to identify its main ideas. You can find the assignment Identify Main Ideas (Ice Age Hunter-Gatherers) in your Social Studies Google Classroom. This assignment will be due on Friday, September 4



Journey of Humankind: Interactive Map  Today we are going to go on a virtual global journey of modern humans over the last 160,000 years. This interactive map "will show for the first time the interaction between migration and climate over this period." Press "play" and watch your ancestors begin their migration out of Africa to the furthest reaches of the globe. Read their stories along the way. Observe the changes in climate that they are forced to confront. Make note of when and how your ancestors first set foot in the American. Enjoy!