Friday, October 30, 2015

Google Mapping



Assignment Turn-In  Happy Halloween! Let's begin the day by making sure that  you have turned in the following assignments, which are due today: Hatshepsut and Ramses II - Comparison-Contrast Paragraph, Hatshepsut and Ramses II - Venn Diagram, Hatshepsut Notes, and Ramses II Notes.

CNN Student News and Current Event Mapping  As we watch CNN Student News today, identify one or two news stories that you can pinpoint geographically and place on the Current Event layer of your Social Studies World Map via Google Maps. 

China, Washington D.C., and South Carolina were all featured in today's segment. After pinning at least one of these places on your map, consider the most important question: What happened here? You should include a title for the event, the date(s) the event took place, a brief summary of what happened, and include an appropriate photo or video. 

Mapping Ancient History  Let's also continue using the 'Ancient History Layer' of your  Social Studies World Map today by adding some of the important historical events that you have learned about so far this year to your map. 

I've provided a list below of some of the historical events we've studied below (along with the page numbers you can learn about them from your Ancient Civilizations textbook). 


Once you've decided on an event, you need to research where it took place. Some of the places from ancient history no longer exist, so you may need to consult both historical and modern maps and compare them to figure out where the event should be pinned on your Google Map.

What happened there? Who was involved? When did it happen? Why was it significant? These are just some of the questions that good reporters ask. After you title your historical event on your map, include the answers to some of this questions as part of the accompanying text. In addition, to your textbook you may also consult reliable online sources to learn more about these historical events. And remember, you can also include an appropriate image or video that relates to the event. Have fun!

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Mapping History


CNN Student News and Current Event Mapping  As we watch CNN Student News today, identify one or two news stories that you can pinpoint geographically and place on the Current Event layer of your Social Studies World Map via Google Maps. 

Syria and Kodiak, Alaska were both featured in today's segment. After pinning at least one of these places on your map, consider the most important question: What happened here? You should include a title for the event, the date(s) the event took place, a brief summary of what happened, and include an appropriate photo or video. 

Mapping Ancient History  We have spent a sizable part of our Social Studies class time mapping events that are taking place around the world right now. But what about events about ancient history? Today you will have an opportunity to use the 'Ancient History Layer' of your  Social Studies World Map by adding some of the important historical events that you have learned about so far this year to your map. 

First, make sure you've added an 'Ancient History Layer' to your Google Map and that is it checked. You may also consider temporarily unchecking the 'Current Events Layer' so there is not confusion about what layer you are working on. 

 
Next, decide which events from ancient history that you've learned about so far that you would like to pin on your map. I've provided a list below of some of the historical events we've studied below (along with the page numbers you can learn about them from your Ancient Civilizations textbook). 

 
Be selective. You can't pin all of these events today. Which are you most interested in learning more about? Once you've decided on an event, you need to research where it took place. Some of the places from ancient history no longer exist, so you may need to consult both historical and modern maps and compare them to figure out where the event should be pinned on your Google Map.

What happened there? Who was involved? When did it happen? Why was it significant? These are just some of the questions that good reporters ask. After you title your historical event on your map, include the answers to some of this questions as part of the accompanying text. In addition, to your textbook you may also consult reliable online sources to learn more about these historical events. And remember, you can also include an appropriate image or video that relates to the event. Have fun! 

Homework  The following assignments are all due tomorrow, Friday, October 30:  Hatshepsut and Ramses II - Venn Diagram, Hatshepsut Notes, Ramses II Notes, and Hatshepsut and Ramses II - Comparison-Contrast Paragraph. 

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Writing Comparison-Contrast Paragraphs


 Today's Writing Objective   Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey information through the use of comparison/contrast.

Warm-Up: Selecting Your Similarities and Differences  As you know, today we will begin writing compare-contrast paragraphs in which we explain the similarities and differences between Hatshepsut and Ramses II. Before we do, however, we must decide which similarities and differences we find most important and want to feature in our paragraphs. 

Your task: Review the Hatshepsut and Ramses II Venn Diagram from yesterday. Using the highlight function, highlight the similarities and differences that you find most important from your venn diagram and that you may want to include in your compare/contrast paragraph.  

What Does a Comparison/Contrast Paragraph Look Like?  When you write to compare or contrast something, the topic sentence tells what you're comparing. The details tell how things are alike or different. 

Check out the example below. 

Also notice how the paragraph uses what we call signal words. Writers use signal words to show when they are comparing or contrasting. Signal words help the reader see that the writer is telling how things are alike or different and showing the connections between ideas. 

Lists of signal words can be found below. Make sure you utilize some of these words in your own paragraphs.

Notice how the example paragraph below employs signal words to show both similarities and differences. 

Lastly, what are the key elements of a good comparison-contrast paragraph? Check out the checklist below. 


Writing Your Hatshepsut and Ramses II Comparison-Contrast Paragraph  Now that you have examined a couple of examples and understand the essential elements of an good comparison-contrast paragraph, it's time to start writing your own. You can find the assignment Hatshepsut and Ramses II - Comparison-Contrast Paragraph in your Social Studies Google Classroom. You will have today and tomorrow to work on your paragraph in class, and it will be due on Friday, October 30.    

Monday, October 26, 2015

Comparing and Contrasting Hatshepsut and Ramses II


 Today's Social Studies Objective   Understand the significance of Queen Hatshepsut and Ramses the Great

 Today's Writing Objective
  Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey information through the use of comparison/contrast

Introducing Comparing and Contrasting  To compare means to tell how two things are alike. To contrast means to tell how they are different. To better understanding comparing and contrasting, check out the video below. 


Applying the Skill: Comparing and Contrasting Hatshepsut and Ramses II  Today we will utilize the skill of comparing and contrasting in order to identify the similarities and differences between the two Egyptian pharaohs Queen Hatshepsut and King Ramses II. What do these two pharaohs have in common with each other? How are they different? 

You will use the document Hatshepsut and Ramses II - Venn Diagram, which you can find in Social Studies Google Classroom, to make note of these similarities and differences. As most of you know, when using a venn diagram, similarities are recorded in the overlapping section of the circles, while the differences between two subjects are made clear in the outer labeled areas of the circles which are not overlapping.

Today, you and your teammates are going to closely examine the two text sets related to Hatshepsut and Ramses II, as well as your Hatshepsut Notes and Ramses II Notes, and try to identify both similarities and differences between these two subjects. You will then record your findings on your Hatshepsut and Ramses II - Venn Diagram. Towards the end of class we will do a whole-class share-out, as each group will have the opportunity to share their similarities and differences with each other. 

Tomorrow, we will begin to construct compare and contrast paragraphs about Hatshepsut and Ramses II based on the similarities and differences we come up with today.  

Homework  Complete your Hatshepsut and Ramses II - Venn Diagram by tomorrow, Tuesday, October 27, so you can use it as a resource to help your write your upcoming Hatshepsut and Ramses II compare/contrast paragraph.

Friday, October 23, 2015

Egyptian Pharaoh Study: Ramses II


 Today's Learning Objective    Understand the significance of Ramses the Great

Warm-Up: What makes a great leader?  Today I want you to consider what makes a leader great? What qualities do great leaders possess? What do great leaders do? Can you think of any examples of great leaders? Share your ideas here 

Examining Ramses II from Multiple Sources  Ramses II is considered by many to be the greatest leader in Ancient Egypt's history. But was he? In order to understand his significance we will be consider Ramses using multiple sources. We will examine a section from our Social Studies textbook, a primary source that includes Ramses's own words, a short documentary video, and finally a Powerpoint presentation designed by a teacher. By examining a text set composed of a variety of sources, my hope is that you will develop a more comprehensive understanding of this complex and remarkable figure from history.

You will use the document Ramses II Notes to document the important things you learn about him and his reign. 

We will begin by reading an excerpt from our Social Studies textbook below.    

Abu Simbel




























Now we will read Ramses's own words (an example of a primary source), in which he blames his own troops for the failures of the Battle of Qadesh.







Ramses the Great and the Battle of Qadesh 

Next, we will watch a video that takes a critical look at Ramses and cast him as essentially a propagandist who built shrines and monuments in his honor as a way of covering up his own failures. Is this a fair perspective?    



Finally, let's check out a PowerPoint presentation designed by a fellow teacher, which tries to take a more balanced view of Ramses II. 

Thursday, October 22, 2015

Egyptian Pharaoh Study: Hatshepsut


 Today's Learning Objective    Understand the significance of Queen Hatshepsut 

Examining Hatshepsut from Multiple Sources  Queen Hatshepsut was one of the most important leaders in Ancient Egypt's history. In order to understand her significance we will be consider Hatshepsut using multiple sources. We will examine a section from our Social Studies textbook, an excerpt from the book Hathshepsut: His Majesty, Herself, a primary source document that includes Hatshepsut's own words, a short documentary video, and finally a poem. By examining a text set composed of a variety of sources, my hope is that you will develop a more comprehensive understanding of this remarkable figure from history.

You will use the document Hatshepust Notes, located in your Social Studies Google Classroom, to document the important things you learn about her and her reign. 

We will begin by reading an excerpt from our Social Studies textbook below.    

Now we will read an excerpt from the book Hathsepsut: HIs Majesty, Herself, which focuses on what Hatshepsut did in order to be accepted as pharaoh by the Egyptian people. 


Next, we will examine a primary source. A primary source is a document or physical object which was written during the time under study. The words below are said to be Hatshepsut's and come directly form an obelisk (an Egyptian monument) inscription created during her reign. What do we learn about Hatshepsut from her actual words? Should this source carry more weight than others? 


Next, check out the short documentary video about Hatshepsut below. 


Finally, read this poem by Ruth Whitman written from the perspective of Hatshepsut. 




HATSHEPSUT:







Before my father came to the throne  



there was chaos in our double kingdom- 



from the Great Green Sea on the north  



to the land of Nubia on our south.







Men without breasts love war.  



They measure their height



by the mountains of severed hands  



piled up, cut from their enemies.







But I saw our land laid out in peace:  



Thebes, the southern city, the horizon of earth  



stretching east to west



and the fecund river cleaving the land



south to north.  



Sun and moon



sail from east to west



across the Nile,



from life to death



and back again.







Symmetry. Order.  



The Nile



floods, recedes, floods.







And over us stretches Nut, 



the goddess who is the sky. 



The sun travels by night 



through her body,



the moon and stars by day. 



Her toes touch the east,



her fingers reach to the west, 



she arches over us,



rainbow mother of night and day.

Homework  (1.) Complete the Map of Ancient Egypt, Egypt Under the Pharaohs - Cognitive Content Dictionary, and Authority Under the Pharaoh assignments, all of  which are due tomorrow, Friday, October 23. (2.) Continue working on the Hatshepsut Notes assignment, which is due next Friday, October 30.

Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Egypt Under the Pharaohs (Day 2)

 Today's Focus Question  How did the pharaohs gain authority over a large kingdom? 


Guided Reading: Egypt Under the Pharaohs  Today we are going to read about how the pharaohs, or rulers of Egypt, were able to gain the authority to rule over Egypt. Where did this assumed power come from? How were a succession of pharaohs able to maintain control of Egypt for so long? As we read excerpts of your Social Studies workbook below, you will use the document Sources of Pharaoh's Authority, which is located in your Social Studies Google Classroom, to take notes on this topic. 


 

Homework  Complete the assignment Sources of Pharaoh's Authority by Friday, October 23

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

Egypt Under the Pharaohs


 Today's Focus Question  How did the pharaohs gain authority over a large kingdom? 


Egypt Under the Pharaohs: Vocabulary Study  Today we will study the key vocabulary related to the leaders and governing of Ancient Egypt, using the document Egypt Under the Pharaohs - Cognitive Content Dictionary, which can be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom. We will be using an excerpt from our Social Studies textbook, which can also be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom (as well as here) to help us understand the lesson's key words and concepts. This assignment will be due Friday, October 23

CNN Student News and Current Event Mapping  As we watch CNN Student News today, identify one or two news stories that you can pinpoint geographically and place on the Current Event layer of your Social Studies World Map via Google Maps. 

Hong Kong and the University of Mississippi (Oxford, Mississippi) were both featured in today's segment. After pinning at least one of these places on your map, consider the most important question: What happened here? You should include a title for the event, the date(s) the event took place, a brief summary of what happened, and include an appropriate photo or video.

Homework  (1.) Don't forget that your Map of Ancient Egypt is due Friday, October 23. (2.) Complete the Egypt Under the Pharaohs - Cognitive Content Dictionary by Friday, October 23

Monday, October 19, 2015

Mapping Ancient Egypt and Previewing the Pharaohs


Mapping Ancient Egypt Activity  Today is your last class day to work on your map of Ancient Egypt. You can still find the assignment Map of Ancient Egypt in your Social Studies Google ClassroomRemember that directions for how to complete the activity are included with the map. 

Exploring Egyptian Pharaohs  If you completed your Ancient Egypt Map, and are ready to continue your exploration of Ancient Egypt, consider an independent investigation of what it meant to be a pharaoh. Tomorrow we will officially learn as a class that the pharaoh was essentially the ruler of Egypt, but today why don't you explore who some of the various pharaohs were over the course of Egyptian history, what their responsibilities were, and what their lives were like. 

The British Museum's Ancient Egypt site has a great section dedicated to the pharaohs here. After reading some background about pharaohs, you can read a story about one of Ancient Egypt's greatest pharaohs Ramses II here. Next, explore Egyptian wall art featuring Ramses II here. Another great resource is the Discovering Egypt site, which has a whole area dedicated to Ancient Egyptian Kings & Kings

Homework  Complete your Map of Ancient Egypt, which is due Friday, October 23 

Friday, October 16, 2015

Mapping Ancient Egypt (Day 2)







Turn-In Assignment Friday  It's Friday and that means it's time to turn in our assignments from the past week. In addition to completing at least two Digital Reading Log entries, you should have also finished and 'turned in' the following: Ancient Egypt Webquest, The Nile River - Cognitive Content Dictionary, and The Nile River - Notetaking Study Guide. Please make sure if you completed these assignments you turn them in through Google Classroom, so you can receive credit.

Mapping Ancient Egypt Activity  Today you continue working on your map of Ancient Egypt. You can still find the assignment Map of Ancient Egypt in your Social Studies Google Classroom. Remember that directions for how to complete the activity are included with the map. This is due next Friday, October 23

Explore the Eagle Times Online School Newspaper  If time permits, check out the hot-of-the-presses brand-new online edition of the Eagle Times, Lakeview's very own student newspaper. The stories are written by and for students, with the guidance of teacher extraordinaire Mr. Gilbert. Please visit the site, bookmark it, and check back regularly for exciting new content.  

Thursday, October 15, 2015

Mapping Ancient Egypt


Mapping Ancient Egypt Activity  Today you will demonstrate what you have learned about the land, important places, and geographic features in and around Ancient Egypt, by labeling a blank map of the region. In your Social Studies Google Classroom you can find the assignment Map of Ancient Egypt. Directions for how to complete the activity are included with the map. 

You may utilize various resources to help you complete the activity. The map below, featured in our Social Studies textbooks, I find particularly helpful. The British Museum's Egypt site also features various maps of Egypt here. Also, some really nice maps of Ancient Egypt can be found here.  

This mapping activity builds upon things that we have studied in class and serves as one way to demonstrate what you have learned about the geography of Ancient Egypt. Therefore, it will count towards your Social Studies assessment grade. In fact, it will be the first graded assessment of the upcoming 2nd quarter and is due on Friday, October 23

CNN Student News and Current Event Mapping  As we watch CNN Student News today, identify one or two news stories that you can pinpoint geographically and place on the Current Event layer of your Social Studies World Map via Google Maps. 

Las Vegas, China, and Thailand were all featured in today's segment. After pinning at least one of these places on your map, consider the most important question: What happened here? You should include a title for the event, the date(s) the event took place, a brief summary of what happened, and include an appropriate photo or video.

Homework  Complete the Ancient Egypt Webquest, The Nile River - Cognitive Content Dictionary, and The Nile River - Notetaking Study Guide assignments, all of  which are due tomorrow, Friday, October 16.  

Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Ancient Egypt: The Nile River Valley (Day 3)


 Today's Focus Question  How did the Nile River affect where people settled in Ancient Egypt?


Warm Up: Adventure on the Nile River  Today you will begin your day at the British Museum's Egypt website here. Your task is to accompany an ancient Egyptian boy from a farming family as he navigates the Nile River. You will help the boy make important decisions about how and where he travels. His survival may ultimately be in your hands. Pay attention to the details of ancient Egypt's geography along the way. 

Guided Reading: The Nile River Valley  Now we will read from the textbook section "The Nile River Valley". The reading selection can be found digital form in your Social Studies Google Classroom, on pages 96-99 of your Social Studies textbooks, and at the link here

As you read, you will record key information from the section using the document The Nile River Valley - Notetaking Study Guide, which can also be found in your Social Studies Google Classroom.

Map of Ancient Egypt, featuring Lower and Upper Egypt





The kings of Upper Egypt work white crown, while the kings of Lower Egypt wore red.

Lower and Upper Egypt were often at war with each other.

According to legend, King Menes was the two kingdoms into one, in about 3100 B.C. The ruler of the combined kingdom wore a double crown of red and white, and was known as the "Lord of the Two Lands." 

Homework  Complete The Nile River - Notetaking Study Guide, which will be due this Friday, October 16.   

Tuesday, October 13, 2015

Ancient Egypt: The Nile River Valley (Day 2)




 Today's Focus Question  How did the Nile River affect where people settled in Ancient Egypt?


The Nile River: Vocabulary Study  Today we will continue studying the key vocabulary related to the geography of Ancient Egypt, using the document The Nile River Valley - Cognitive Content Dictionary, which can be found in your Social Studies Google ClassroomWe will be using an excerpt from our Social Studies textbook, which accompanies the Cognitive Content Dictionary (and which you can also find here), to help us understand the lesson's key words and concepts.
Map of Ancient Egypt
Egypt's Black Land and Red Land
Map of Lower Egypt and the Nile Delta
Nile River Cataract
Satellite Image of Egypt 

CNN Student News and Current Event Mapping  As we watch CNN Student News today, identify one or two news stories that you can pinpoint geographically and place on the Current Event layer of your Social Studies World Map via Google Maps. 

Syria, Jerusalem, Las Vegas, and Canton Tower in China were all featured in today's segment. After pinning at least one of these places on your map, consider the most important question: What happened here? You should include a title for the event, the date(s) the event took place, a brief summary of what happened, and include an appropriate photo or video.

Homework  Complete The Nile River Valley - Cognitive Content Dictionary, which is due Friday, October 16.

Monday, October 12, 2015

Ancient Egypt: The Nile River Valley



 Unit Focus Question  How did the Ancient Egyptians create a brilliant and long-lasting civilization in a desert land?


 Today's Focus Question  How did the Nile River affect where people settled in Ancient Egypt?


Warm-Up: CNN Student News and Current Event Mapping  As we watch CNN Student News today, identify one or two news stories that you can pinpoint geographically and place on the Current Event layer of your Social Studies World Map via Google Maps. 

Both Ankara, Turkey, and Afghanistan were featured in today's segment. After pinning one or both of these places on your map, consider the most important question: What happened here? You should include a title for the event, the date(s) the event took place, a brief summary of what happened, and include an appropriate photo or video.

Video: "The Nile Gives Life"  We now move from understanding events happening now to events that happened long ago. To begin, we will watch a short video about the geography, of Ancient Egypt, with a special focus on the importance of the Nile River. 

The Nile River: Vocabulary Study  Next, we will study the key vocabulary related to the geography of Ancient Egypt, using the document The Nile River Valley - Cognitive Content Dictionary, which can be found in your Social Studies Google ClassroomWe will be using an excerpt from our Social Studies textbook, which accompanies the Cognitive Content Dictionary (and which you can also find here), to help us understand the lesson's key words and concepts.


Map of Ancient Egypt
Egypt's Black Land and Red Land
Map of Lower Egypt and the Nile Delta
Nile River Cataract
Satellite Image of Egypt 

Homework  Complete The Nile River Valley - Cognitive Content Dictionary, which is due Friday, October 16.